All hail the tip turkey

Tip turkey works through the plastic — a TROJAN
Tip turkey has no time for posing — he’s no STATUE
Tip Turkey is adorned with smears — a saucy TOMATO
Tip Turkey cries to the sky — frogs smoking CIGARETTES
Tip turkey smells unpleasant — but not more than homely TIP
Tip turkey fell from perfect grace — some may even call him SACRED
Tip turkey is no pink flamingo — no smiling lawn adorning TIP
Tip turkey is flung at the margins — discarded CIGARETTES
Tip turkey is letting himself go — bald seedy as TOMATO
Tip turkey follows reckless trash — a tributary STATUE
Tip turkey has no hidden surprise — he’s no TROJAN

Poet’s note: Tip turkey is a common name for Threskiornis moluccus, the Australian white ibis.

PS Cottier

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The tip turkey came second in a recent poll of Australia’s favourite bird, beaten by a beak by the magpie. I voted for the budgie or the cockatoo; I can’t really remember. The idea of a ‘favourite bird’ is a bit silly, after all! This poem has been rummaging in the bins of my writing folder for ages, so I thought I’d share it.

The poem was originally called ‘But in the air they make such lovely arrows’ which explains the shape, but I thought it was a tad confusing. The tip turkey above was walking down a Canberra street like a particularly smelly ballet dancer.

UPDATE: The poem’s shape is lost on phone display. Sorry.

Rubik’s soundcube
my dull lips and ears
can’t decipher
a glorious puzzle —
international students

PS Cottier

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I was just thinking what a boring place Canberra would be without the ANU and other universities attracting so many international students, and this tanka was the result.

Looking forward to another year of posting on (most!) Tuesdays

Tuesday poem: Senryu

November 14, 2017

camera catches
side-eye and grimace
‘say rictus!

PS Cottier

Rictus makes a nice change from cheese, anyway. And here is a totally unrelated image, although it also uses the word ‘side’. A triumph of signage, and not a bad title for a poetry collection!

sign

 

Tuesday Poem: Cactus

November 6, 2017

Cactus

Spiky camel hump, buried in sand.
Alien artichoke, Martian’s lunch.
I’m told to admire your
‘architectural qualities’. As if
we build houses of needles,
like one of those three little pigs
gone crazy, his brain curling,
dizzy, to match pale gimlet tail.
What huffing
fire-mouthed dragon
could blow you down?
Crooked eyes only, crave cacti.

Yet, every few years, you explode
into a neon gown of Brazilian hues
pulsating, pink or gold, as at Mardi Gras.
When poor become princes,
and thin desert blooms.

PS Cottier

cactus

An ancient poem this one, if ten years qualifies as ancient.  My cactus just bloomed, hence my digging it (the poem) up.

***
I just had two poems published in issue 23 of Failed Haiku, which is a great name for a journal.  It refers to senryu, which are like haiku but quirkier. The home page is definitely worth a visit, for links to information about senryu, and so you can download the issues.  I won’t link to the PDF of issue 23 (November 2017) here, but it is easily accessed at the site. The editor, Mike Rehling, also makes some interesting comments about senryu that particularly caught his eye.

Another linked poem, this time published in on-line journal Umbel & Panicle.  I had to look both those words up, and they deal with the way flowers are arranged on plants.

The journal concerns itself with poetry on botanic themes, which change with every issue.  The theme that attracted me was ‘Nightshade’.  My speculative poem is concerned with werewolves and goji berries, and has a very naughty last line.  Hope you enjoy it! 

Take the time to read some of the other poetry too; I’m really pleased to see my humorous poem amongst some pieces of a totally different tone.  A very beautiful journal to look at too. I was tossing up whether to go with a botanical or wolfy picture, and the lupine won out.

howl-wolves